PGA Tour of Australasia

This is a golf tour that mainly takes place in Australia and New Zealand, but also a few other places. While the best golf players from Down Under usually compete in championships abroad, like the European Tour and the PGA tour, they do frequently return home for events like this one. The tour of Australasia therefore acts like a feeder for bigger golf tours.

The better you become as a golfer living in Australia (or anywhere within the loosely defined area of Australasia), you might start wondering how to get yourself into a PGA tour. You’ll need a tour card, which in the case of PGA Tour of Australasia, can be obtained by placing yourself among the top 40 in the qualifying tournament. This tour card must be retained, which you do by being ranked as one of the top 60 by the point system known as the Order of Merit.

If you rank between 61st and 75th place you’re given a conditional status, and any player ranked between 61st and 100th place will be able to enter the final stage of the qualifying tournament. Should you end up outside the top 100, you’re likely to lose your tour card.

Co-sanctions

Even though the PGA Tour of Australasia is predominantly held in Australia as well as New Zealand, tournaments have in the past been co-sanctioned with other international tours, allowing PGA Australasian tournaments to be held in other countries such as Thailand and India. Events like Fiji International is also co-sanctioned by PGA Australasia. Other events are co-sanctioned with big global events like the European Tour, which has helped inspire high ranked professionals to enter.

The different championships within the tour even carry world ranking points. The amounts of points vary between the different championships, but the most prestigious one, the Australian Open, gives the winner at least 32 points.

The Triple Crown

Within the tour, three of the major all-Australian championships include Australian Masters, Australian PGA Championship and the Australian Open. Only once has someone won all three championships in one season, and that was Robert Allenby in 2005.